Introduction to Testing – PitchFix AquaBrush

The function of those little grooves on our golf clubs are so vital. Believe it or not, they are one of the keys, and quite possible are the most underrated key in the performance of our golf clubs. Clean grooves are vital in creating spin. Greater spin equals greater control.

Pitchfix is a leading manufacturer of golf accessories. From divot repair tools to the AquaBrush. A compact brush that attaches to your golf bag which allows golfers to keep their grooves and golf balls clean throughout their round. The latter being overlooked, because, for many golf courses in 2020, ball washers could not be placed onto the golf course due to COVID-19 safety protocols.

I just received an AquaBrush to field test and review, which is perfect for golf this time of the year. Any play right now will involve playing in very wet conditions. This is the perfect time to test the AquaBrush from Pitchfix.

Upon unboxing the AquaBrush, a couple of features stood out to me. Worth noting were…

  • Small compact design
  • Ergonomic. Feels good in the hand
  • High-quality, stable bristles

Many thanks go out to Al Abrams from Abrams Golf Solutions for giving me the opportunity.

Stay tuned right here for more information and the full review on AquaBrush. In the meantime, please enjoy the video below.

Until The Next Tee!!

#fightandgrind #seeuonthenexttee

Rapsodo Golf MLM Testing Update and the Season to Change

Testing is well underway of the Rapsodo Golf MLM. Out of the gate, the device was pretty impressive giving me some data that was very eye-opening. The information that I received started to explain some of the reasoning why I’ve lost distance. Namely, my launch angles that were too low. To the eye, I thought that my launch and consequent trajectory was good.

I’ve really enjoyed testing the device, however, a little bit of doubt has crept into my mind regarding results that I’m seeing. Mostly in the distance category, which in turn, has given me some doubts about the accuracy of the distance and launch angles.

During my most recent range sessions, I’ve received data that showed a discrepancy of 18-20 yards between the data I was given and the actual distance (in carry). I observed my golf ball landing 130-134 yards (with a PW), meanwhile, the MLM was telling me something considerably less. The MLM showed that the strike flew 23 yards less than the actual flight.

Doubt has crept in regarding accuracy of the Rapsodo MLM.

Since these videos were captured, I have since upgraded the firmware and ensured that the MLM has a full charge. Also, I happened to see in the FAQ’s on the Rapsodo Golf website that for the most accurate results, white golf balls should be used. The range where my sessions took place used yellow golf balls. Maybe that’s the issue?

Either way, I have since reached out with queries regarding these matters, giving the MLM an honest chance to prove it’s mettle and claims. I’ve even asked if my phone should be out of the case. I’m certain that it fits into the slots properly. It’s all about due diligence.

The fall golfing season is a great time of the year. The courses generally thin out a little and I love the fall foliage. But when the foliage falls off of the trees, it means that the inevitable is coming for us in the north. The snow isn’t too far behind. This is the time of the year to start making changes, if you feel that you need to address any issues.

Among the issues that I face this off-season, is a switch from a standard grip size with two wraps to oversize. Arthritis has plagued me in 2020 and suddenly, it seems like oversized or jumbo grips are in order. There will be another article in the near future on this topic and others. Are you planning on making any changes?

Stay tuned for more.

Until The Next Tee!!

#fightandgrind #seeuonthenexttee

REVIEW – Riverview Golf Course (Fenwick, ON)

The Set-Up

The Niagara Region is home to a stunning number of golf courses. While some have fallen by the wayside due to a sagging economy in Niagara, others have seemed to stay the course. One of those golf courses staying the course is that of Riverview Golf Club in Fenwick, ON. As a matter of fact, for as long as I can remember the golf course was there. My parents would visit the farm next door to get sweet corn from Hewitt’s. Every day during my high school years, I’d pass by Riverview Golf Course while on the school bus.

Some people will contend that it’s geography is in question. Is this golf course is in the metropolis of Wainfleet, ON (where I grew up)? Others will contend that it sit’s in Pelham, or even Welland. No matter where you want to say Riverview Golf Course is located, here’s what you get here. If you were to drive from the Toronto/Hamilton area you would travel along the QEW Niagara, until you got to the Vineland/Victoria Avenue exit. Upon arriving there you’d take the exit and travel due south, straight down Victoria Avenue, which consequently turns into Regional Road #24. If you cross the Welland River, you’ve gone way too far.

The first tee. The first fairway is tight at Riverview Golf Course and it sets you up for the rest of the day.

The Transition

Riverview Golf Course is a regulation length Par-72 golf course that measures just over 6600 yards from the tips (Blue Tees). I tried to do some research to see who the golf course architect was, while those efforts came up empty, I can tell you that this course was built in 1957. The golf course itself is what I would describe as a parkland-style golf course but the two nine’s that compose the golf course are very contrasting.

Golfers might suggest that the front 9 is boring and mundane. Perhaps pedestrian? As a matter of fact, as you drive in from the direction that I described, you’d look at it and just sort of shrug it off. However, looks can be deceiving. Meanwhile, the back 9 grabs your attention more. Rolling terrain, and holes that run along the Welland River. With some awfully tempting risk/reward holes thrown in for good measure.

My round at Riverview Golf Course earlier this season marked the first time that I had played the golf course. When it comes to amenities, the Pro Shop stands alone from the clubhouse in its own separate building, There is a bar and kitchen, however, I didn’t set foot into the clubhouse. There is no driving range at Riverview Golf Course, so getting there really early for your tee time to warm-up isn’t necessary. Ironically enough, this is convenient considering the COVID-19 protocols that we face in 2020. For warming up, there is a short-game area, and as far as locating the practice green, that’s found around the corner from the Pro Shop. If you haven’t been there before you don’t see it until you approach the first tee. Make sure that you ask for it. I wish that I would have.

Riverview Golf Course is a family-run facility. The golf course operates on what I assume is a relatively small budget and the turf crew is quite small. My understanding from Randy (my playing partner) is that the owner’s father is the superintendent. Not to jump too far ahead, but, they do a great job on the golf course with the budget that they operate on.

The golf course itself, plays very fairly. As mentioned, we’re talking about a golf course that really feels like two separate golf courses. The first hole is a 540 yard Par-5 that has a slight dogleg right. A small pond guards the left side of the green, that I’m certain, regularly catches golf balls on approaches that are left short. The green itself is smallish and elongated. You really want to favour centre-right for your approach shot. In general, the greens are pretty small at Riverview Golf Course with the exception of a few which makes striking the golf ball a premium.

The one thing that I really noticed on the front 9 was how tight the fairways were. The trees are everywhere! On the front nine, I would say that my favourite hole was the Par-4 5th. My eye liked everything about this hole. A slight dogleg left, water just to the left of the green. I just thought that it was a pretty golf hole. The Par-3 holes on the front nine aren’t slouches. The 4th hole has a large landing area in front, a bunker guarding the right side of the green and plays around 160 yards. However, on the date of play, the yardage was around 135 yards. The green here is very accessible. Meanwhile, the 9th hole is a bear that plays into the prevailing south/southwest wind that makes this 185-yard play like significantly longer. Standing on the 9th tee, the hole looks longer, much longer. Water is short and right. Did I mention that there’s no shortage of water hazards to look at during your round at Riverview Golf Course?

As mentioned, the back 9 is located on rolling terrain that runs along the Welland River. Many of the golf holes are located in low-lying areas, so periods in the spring, or periods of heavy rainfall will be effected by the river. On occsion, the back nine will flood and this is something that I recollect going by on a school bus, oh so many years ago. I love the back nine!! As a matter of fact, if you were to survey golfers that have played Riverview Golf Course will almost tell you to a man or a woman that they prefer the back. The Par-3 11th is another bear of a hole that measure 225 yards. The green is elevated and reminds me a little bit of a turtle shell. Miss the green in any direction, and you’ll find yourself down a serious slope and scrambling to make a bogey (best-case scenario) or worse.

My favourite hole on the entire golf course is with no doubt in mind, the 12th hole (pictured above). A risk/reward Par-4 with plenty of options from the elevated tee you can either lay up to one of the multiple patches of fairway (which is the definite safe play) or , you can try to drive the green. There’s trouble just short, right, and long of the green. My tee shot found the little creek that lies just in front of the green. I needed 290 yards to cover, I got 280 yards.

The rest of the golf holes are quite nice, I loved the 13th hole, the green of the Par-3 16th is a pretty immense two-tiered (or did it have three tiers) green. The 17th hole is so pretty looking from the green back towards the tee. While the finishing hole is a short, 300 Par 4 that is uphill the entire way and plays into the prevailing wind. Honestly, the hole plays closer to 400 yards than 300 yards. Try to cut the dogleg along the right side, and you’ll catch the strand of trees.

Looking back from the 17th green at Riverview Golf Course.

The Finish

My round of golf at Riverview Golf Course was quite enjoyable. The pace of play was excellent. I enjoyed the holes and to be frank, Riverview Golf Course is a very fun golf course to play. You have to golf your ball and hit golf shots to score here. My striking was off and I paid the price.

The greens are in very good shape, although they were rolling quite slow. If I were to guess, on the day that I played, I’m not certain that they were rolling at 7′ on the stimpmeter. Downhill putts failed to make it to the hole. But the greens are visually appealing and not overly scarred from poor golf etiquette.

The tee decks are, generally, in good shape as are the fairways. There are however, some rough areas on the fairway that could be considered “ground under repair”. Outlying areas of the fairways are rough and very hard from the clay-based soil that we often see in Niagara. If you don’t want to deal with it, make sure you hit the fairway.

There are downfalls. The bunkers here are in rough shape and are in dire need of work to repair them or do away with them totally. Perhaps the consideration of filling them in and going with grass bunkers instead is an option. I feel obligated to point out that it appeared that they do have plans to address the bunkers. Also, when there’s nowhere to have the option to strike a couple of golf balls (whether into a net or a range) I tend to view it as a shortcoming.

My round cost me $50 CAD + tax for 18 holes w/cart which is the median price point in the area. As long as the greens are in good shape, I’m happy. After all, we pay greens fees and do not pay “fairway fees” or “tees fees”. If you’re in the area, Riverview Golf Course might be a place for you to try.

Until The Next Tee!!

#seeuonthenexttee #fightandgrind

Using The Rapsodo Golf MLM To Help Swing Faults

2020 has been full of surprises. I’m not talking about the obvious things like COVID-19, “Murder Hornets”, and everything else that has been 2020. But I’m talking about issues in my golf swing and adjustments that I’ve had to make. That’s going to be an upcoming article in itself.

On a mission to stop “flipping out”.

This year, I’ve had an ugly swing fault creep into my golf swing. A fault that pretty much came from out of nowhere. This fault or miss, has literally de-railed rounds of golf this season. That fault is the thin or “flipping” the club.

If you’ve never had the thin, it’s an ugly miss that provides no launch angle, causes poor direction, you lose spin on approach shots, causes a loss of clubhead speed, and with it consequently, lost distance. An iron shot that misses by one groove will cost a golfer 10-15 yards.

Through the use (thus far) of the Rapsodo Golf MLM it has given me very telling signs of the issues that I’ve experienced all season. Even though I knew that I was thinning shots, including low strikes on the face of the driver and metalwoods, it wasn’t until the use of the MLM where I saw the root cause of my issues. Very low launch angles which means that something was occurring at the point of impact. If your launch angle isn’t where it needs to be, it’s going to hurt you, even if your trajectory looks good like it did in my case. I’ve been flirting with trouble all season.

So, I went to the range yesterday at Brock Golf Course to focus on the flip with the goal of ultimately, killing the flip. The focus of this session was on my right or bottom hand and keeping the angle of the wrist at impact. When the dust settled, it was a pretty good session with the flip being held very much in check. A couple of them crept in.

Eliminating the flip. Bottom hand wrist angle at impact (flipping) vs maintaining the angle and compressing the golf ball.

When it comes to the driver and the metalwoods I now saw much better launch angles and ultimately more distance.

Stay tuned, right here, at Until The Next Tee for more testing and my thoughts regarding the Rapsodo Golf MLM (Mobile Launch Monitor).

Until The Next Tee!!

#fightandgrind #seeuonthenexttee

Introducing the New CNCPT Irons – Engineered by Titleist

The latest realizations of this process – the new CP-03 and CP-04 irons– have been constructed from exotic high-performance materials that can take up to eight months just to source. Each part has been forged and cast to the extreme limits of precision, yielding a strike that generates supreme ball speed with ideal launch and unparalleled forgiveness:

  • CP-03 provides an astonishing balance of power and control in a progressive midsize muscle back profile;
  • CP-04 advances the original CP-01 design, delivering ultimate speed with enhanced accuracy in a player’s improvement head shape.

They join the superior blade-size performance of CP-02 in the new CNCPT series – available for fittings beginning today, Sept. 24.

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CNCPT PERFORMANCE & TECHNOLOGY

Every CNCPT iron is designed and engineered to an inconceivable standard of excellence through the following innovations:

  • Forged supermetal L-face insert– the thinnest unsupported, constant-thickness face in golf – produces supreme ball speeds with increased launch (mid to low irons). CNCPT irons are the first club designs to utilize this rare, super strong alloy.
  • Multi-material, hollow body design allows for optimized MOI and CG placement in every iron through the set.
  • Extraordinary amounts of high-density tungsten weighting – making up nearly 50 percent of the total head weight in the lower lofts – provide precise sweet spot calibration and greater clubhead stability. At least 100 grams of tungsten on average (mid to low irons) is used in each iron to produce the most generous and forgiving impact possible.

“CNCPT is the dream project for our engineers,” said Marni Ines, Titleist Golf Club R&D’s Director of Irons Development. “We’re on the journey to not only design the ultimate iron – but actually figure out how to make it. We’ve made a huge leap forward with the discovery of this supermetal alloy – the material is so strong and resilient that we’re able to forge iron faces even thinner than we once thought possible. It’s difficult to obtain and extremely challenging to implement into the manufacturing process, but the benefits to the overall construction in terms of ball speed, launch, distance and trajectory are just astounding.”

CNCPT MODELS

The CNCPT series is designed to allow players to construct their ideal blend of irons using any of the three models. The look, feel and performance of each iron provides a seamless transition in any combination:CP-02: Superior performance with a blade size and feel

  • Progressive muscle back profile
  • Minimal offset
  • Average of 113g tungsten per iron (3-8)

CP-03: Astonishing balance of power and control

  • Progressive midsize muscle back profile
  • Minimal offset
  • Average of 104g tungsten per iron (3-7)

CP-04: Ultimate speed with enhanced accuracy

  • Progressive midsize profile
  • Moderate offset
  • Average of 100g tungsten per iron (4-7)

FITTINGS & AVAILABILITY

Golfers can experience the performance of CNCPT by Titleist irons by attending a Titleist Fitting and Trial event (including Titleist Thursdays), being held at locations nationwide. To find an event, or book a CNCPT fitting with a Titleist Product Specialist, golfers can visit  https://www.titleist.com/fitting/appointments.

CNCPT by Titleist irons are available for fittings and custom order beginning Sept. 24. MAP $500/club.